Day 43 of #yogasutrachallenge: YS 1.43 Smrti-parusuddhau svarupa-sunyevartha-matra-nirbhasa nirvitarka: In the next stage of meditation, the memory is cleared and the object of concentration shines

Day 43 of #yogasutrachallenge: YS 1.43 Smrti-parusuddhau svarupa-sunyevartha-matra-nirbhasa nirvitarka: In the next stage of meditation, the memory is cleared and the object of concentration shines on its own It is a natural tendency among most of us to label things and put them in boxes. Ok, maybe not literally (certainly I’m not that organised), but definitely metaphorically. We do it all the time: society is full of labels: ‘You’re straight’, ‘I’m gay’, ‘He’s a hipster’, ‘She’s a goth’, ‘Yogi’, ‘Foodie’, ‘WAG’…it seems every day we’re creating a new box to put ourselves in, before we go into our final ‘box’ underground. As we all know, categorising people makes things easier – we can ‘consume’ the idea of a French restaurant entrepreneur living in Notting Hill, or a skinny artist in East London. Our marketing-driven culture just reinforces those stereotypes, and we romanticise them even for ourselves. We owe ourselves more than that. It’s also for this reason admire those in the public eye who continually escape any ‘box’ the world tries to put them in and just does what they do (thinking of Angie at the moment, who’s just release the second film she’s directed in an amongst her UN work, acting, and being a mother. Amazing.). Similarly, we’re very quick to judge something as ‘good’ or ‘bad’, ‘healthy’ or ‘unhealthy’, ‘safe’ or ‘dangerous’, ‘loyal’, ‘worthy’, ‘a bitch’, ‘arrogant’, ‘a waste of time’, ‘hopeless’, ‘successful’. These labels are a trap we can easily fall into, and it’s not going to do us any favours. Just as an example, someone with certain dietary deficiencies and someone with heart disease and type 2 diabetes will require a different definition of what’s ‘good’ or ‘bad’ for them. Patanjali says the next step towards enlightenment is learning to free the mind from this kind of thinking. No associations. No judgements. No conclusions. No fragmented layers of thought like in yesterday’s sutra. We start with the object of our meditation. Whatever it is, we learn to see it just as it truly is, shining in its essence.

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Natalie MorrisonComment