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Transform your well-being, body and performance with Natalie Cristal Morrison. Natalie is a London based yoga teacher, mindfulness coach, Personal Trainer, NLP Practitioner and Health Coach. She offers corporate wellness and team performance training to optimise your and your team's well-being and success. 

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Natalie shares her yoga life - attending yoga events, classes and workshops in London and around the world. The yoga world from the inside. Yoga philosophy - the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, the Bhagavad Gita, the Hatha Yoga Pradipika and much more.  

Day 31 of #yogasutrachallenge: YS 1.31 Duhkha-daurmanasyangam-ejayatva-svasa-prasvasa viksepa-saha-bhuva

Natalie Morrison

Day 31 of #yogasutrachallenge: YS 1.31 Duhkha-daurmanasyangam-ejayatva-svasa-prasvasa viksepa-saha-bhuva My interpretation: Disturbances in the mind are accompanied by pain, dejection, trembling limbs, excessive inhalation and exhalation, and distraction. Yesterday Patanjali outlined the ways the mind becomes diverted from practice. In this sutra, he warns that these distractions come with even more negative baggage. Whereas the distractions on the whole seem to prevent you practicing in the first place, it seems, even if you do try, it’s going to be a pretty miserable experience. This reminds me of a Mysore-style (self-practice) yoga class I went to recently. I really wanted to go as it was led by the brilliant @kinoyoga and I had been looking forward to it for weeks. Unfortunately, it was the morning after my birthday night out, and let’s just say I wasn’t in best the state for yoga – pretty ‘disturbed’ according to every one of Patanjali’s criteria. And it’s true: every moment of the practice hurt. I felt dejected. My legs trembled, my heart raced, and I found myself looking around the room at any opportunity when my every move wasn’t being scrutinised by one of the hawk-eyed assistants with a “you didn’t take a Vinyasa in between matsyansana A and B!” or the like. It was terrible. Next day, though, I turned up fresh as a daisy and it was one of the best self-practices I’ve done (aided by some truly fabulous adjusts). Ok, so this was an exception: it was my birthday, and I’d still probably do the same again. But generally speaking, the moral of the story is: rather than giving in to the whims of your feeble body and your mind, cultivate a sense of doing things for others, and out of appreciation of the divine and your higher purpose, and your life will probably change a lot, to the point where finding the peace and bliss of enlightenment (or even just doing a Kino-led Mysore-style yoga class), becomes a whole lot easier.

A photo posted by @natalietrue.yoga on